Weave Scope and Weave Flux @Hacktoberfest

Long time no blog

It’s been a busy half a year since my last blog post. Immersing myself in the cloud native world and my non-work related training kept me quite busy. I learned quite a lot and it’s been a very rewarding experience, but whenever I thought “hey, I should blog about this”, something else came up which grabbed my attention.

This time I wanted to get the word out about a fun project I was involved in and reflect a bit on some aspects of these last six months.

Hacktoberfest

I wrote about it in the Weaveworks blog already: the Weave Scope and Weave Flux teams are participating in Hacktoberfest! ❤ If you haven’t heard about it yet: Hacktoberfest is a month-long celebration of getting involved in open source. It’s happening for the fifth time now and the general idea is: You sign up, and if you manage to contribute five pull requests on Github in October you win a Hacktoberfest t-shirt. To me it’s a very low-barrier initiative and fun way to get to know Open Source and new communities. I love how everybody benefits from this.

As a contributor, apart from getting a nice t-shirt, it’s your chance to learn more about open source, get in touch with a community of developers, learn about how they do things, learn about new tools, being welcomed with your view on a problem and maybe joining the team after all.

From my own experience I know how empowering it feels to be welcomed into a group of fellow contributors who all care about the project as much as you do. To learn from seasoned developers and have your work integrated into later releases and others benefit from your fix as well.

I still remember how quickly after joining the Ubuntu community about 13-14 years ago (yes, it’s really been that long) and after having been encouraged to get some of my work uploaded into Ubuntu, I realised that we could do a lot better at helping new contributors get started. I wanted others to benefit from my experience and what I had learned from the (quite busy) maintainers in the day. I started collecting links to helpful docs, code snippets and tasks to work on on the Wiki. It was a simple thing to do, and over time our whole developer team took the experience of new contributors on as a cornerstone of the project.

As a project member and maintainer, events like Hacktoberfest are your opportunity to reflect on questions like

  • How do we invite new contributors in the project? How high or low is the bar for entry?
  • Are our docs sufficient? Can new folks find their way around easily?
  • Is our use of tools and process well-defined and clear?
  • Are we good at identifying new issues and detailing where and how to fix them?

So apart from just finding new contributors or getting issues fixed in your code, you also get to learn about an outsider’s perspective and how your project is run. If you take the feedback seriously, it’s a good way to pave the way for others to come in.

Weave Scope and Weave Flux

Scope and Flux are two very important projects at Weaveworks and they both tell the GitOps story from different angles.

Weave Scope has a special place in my heart. When I demoed Weave Cloud at events in the past couple of months the Explore part of it (which uses Weave Scope internally) especially drew attention, because everyone immediately got how important observability is in a micro-services world. Scope can be used in very different scenarios and is written using modern languages. I’ve been part of the Weave Scope meetings in the past few weeks and it was great to see how people from different parts of the globe got together, front-enders, back-enders, designers and just generally interested folks who want to improve Scope for their particular use. I was glad that Satyam Zode brought up the idea of participating in Hacktoberfest and started by going through the list of issues to see which would be good for new contributors (thanks Bryan and Filip who helped out as well!).

If this sounds interesting check out the Weave Scope Hacktoberfest page.

Weave Flux is the Kubernetes GitOps operator, it’s what deploys new images and config to your cluster and makes sure that the state of the cluster matches the config in git. It’s easy to get up and running and very versatile. It’s what Weaveworks has been using for years now and many of our customers and general users rely on to go faster. In the past months I’ve seen an influx of new developers on Slack, drive-by contributions and new thoughts about where to take the project. I’m really pleased how friendly this community is and how keen to help each other out.

If you’re interested in helping out here, take a look at the Weave Flux Hacktoberfest page.

Leave a comment if you’re participating in Hacktoberfest too!