Categories
Ubuntu

Summarising the last CC meeting

I’m very happy that folks took notes during and after the meeting to bring up their ideas, thoughts, concerns and plans. It got a bit unwieldy, so Elfy put up a pad which summarises it and is meant to discuss actions and proposals.

Today we are going to have a meeting to discuss what’s on the “actions” pad. That’s why I thought it’d be handy to put together a bit of a summary of what people generally brought up. They’re not my thoughts, I’m just putting them up for further discussion.

Problem statements

  • Feeling that people innovate *with* Ubuntu, not *in* Ubuntu.
  • Perception of contributor drop in “older” parts of the community.
    • Less activity at UDS/vUDS/UOS events (was discussed at UOS too, maybe we need a committee which finds a new vision for Ubuntu Community Planning)?
    • Less activity in LoCos (lacking a sense of purpose?)
    • No drop in members/developers.
  • Less activity in Canonical-led projects.
  • We don’t spend marketing money on social media. Build a pavement online.
  • Downloading a CD image is too much of a barrier for many.
  • Our “community infrastructure” did not scale with the amount of users.
  • Some discussion about it being hard becoming a LoCo team. Bureaucracy from the LoCo Council.
  • We don’t have enough time to train newcomers.
  • Language barriers make it hard for some to get involved.
  • Canonical does a bad job announcing their presence at events.

Questions

  • Why are less people innovating in Ubuntu? Is Canonical driving too much of Ubuntu?
  • Why aren’t more folks stepping up into leadership positions? Mentoring? Lack of opportunities? More delegation? Do leaders just come in and lead because they’re interested?
  • Lack of planning? Do we re-plan things at UOS events, because some stuff never gets done? Need more follow-through? More assessment?

Proposals

  • community.ubuntu.com: More clearly indicate Canonical-led projects? Detail active projects, with point of contact, etc? Clean up moribund projects.
  • Make Ubuntu events more about “doing things with Ubuntu”?
  • Ubuntu Leadership Mentoring programme.
  • Form more of an Ubuntu ecosystem, allowing to earn money with Ubuntu.

Join the hangout on ubuntuonair.com on Friday, 12th December 2014, 16 UTC.

Categories
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Community Discussions distilled, in a hangout, in work items

It’s fantastic that a we have more discussion about where we want our community to go. We get ideas out of it, people communicate and get a common understanding of issues. Jono’s blog post and the ubuntu-community-team mailing list generated a lot of good stuff already. Last week we had an IRC meeting with the CC and discussed governance and leadership in there.

We took quite a bit of notes, and Elfy set up a doc where we note down actions. I would like to suggest we have

Please

  • use Elfy’s action’s doc for submitting agenda items,
  • your agenda item is a concrete proposal or something which could be turned into work items,
  • make sure you’re there,
  • add your name to it!

Looking forward to seeing you there! 🙂

Categories
Ubuntu

Long mailing list discussions

I’m very happy that the ubuntu-community-team mailing list is seeing lots of discussion right now. It shows how many people deeply care about the direction of Ubuntu’s community and have ideas for how to improve things.

Looking back through the discussion of the last weeks, I can’t help but notice a few issues we are running into – issues all to common on open source project mailing lists. Maybe you all have some ideas on how we could improve the discussion?

  • Bikeshedding
    The term bikeshedding has a negative connotation, but it’s a very natural phenomenon. Rouven, a good friend of mine, recently pointed out that the recent proposal to change the statutes of the association behind our coworking space (which took a long time to put together) received no comments on the internal mailing list, whereas a change of the coffee brand seemed to invite comments from everyone.
    It is quite natural for this to happen. In a bigger proposal it’s natural for us to comment on anything that is tangible. Discussions in our community of more technical people you will often see discussions about which technology to use, rather than an answer which tries to comment on all aspects.
  • Idea overload
    Being a creative community can sometimes be a bit of a curse. You end up with different proposals plus additional ideas and nobody or few to actually implement them.
  • Huge proposals
    Sometimes you see a mail on a list which lists a huge load of different things. Without somebody who tracks where the discussion is going, summing things up, making lists of work items, etc. it will be very hard to convert a discussion into an actual project.
  • Derailing the conversation
    You’ve all seen this happen: you start the conversation with a specific problem or proposal and end up discussing something entirely different.

All of the above are nothing new, but in a part of our project where discussions tend to be quite general and where we have contributors from many different parts of the community some of the above are even more true.

Personally I feel that all of the above are fine problems to have. We are creative and we have ideas on how to improve things – that’s great. In my mind I always treated the ubuntu-community-team mailing list as a place to kick around ideas, to chat and to hang out and see what others are doing.

As I care a lot about our community and I’d still like to figure out how we can avoid the risk of some of the better ideas falling through the cracks. What do you think would help?

Maybe a meeting, maybe every two weeks to pick up some of the recent discussion and see together as a group if we can convert some of the discussion into something which actually flies?