Scope training materials

For some time we have had training materials available for learning how to write Ubuntu apps.  We’ve had a number of folks organising App Dev School events in their LoCo team. That’s brilliant!

What’s new now are training materials for developing scopes!

It’s actually not that hard. If you have a look at the workshop, you can prepare yourself quite easily for giving the session at a local event.

As we are working on an updated developer site, right now, for now take a look at the following pages if you’re interested in running such a session yourself:

I would love to get feedback, so please let me know how the materials work out for you!

Accompanying a new generation of developers

The Ubuntu Developer Advisory Team has been in place for two or three release cycles already and it’s been a fun journey so far. We’ve got in touch with many many new contributors and old contributors as well. If you don’t know what this team does, here’s what our wiki page has to say:

We

  • Reach out to new contributors, thank them for their work and get feedback.
  • Reach out to people who might be ready to apply for upload rights and help them.
  • Reach out to contributors that went inactive and get feedback from them and offer help.

I personally found this very rewarding as I got to talk to many new contributors and see how they feel about Ubuntu Development.

You can help!

If the above sounds interesting to you and you enjoy engaging socially, if you have made a few experiences in Ubuntu Development and want to help out, please talk to me or comment below. It’d be great to have you on board!

Спасибо всем!

If you track the Packaging Guide page very closely, you will have noticed it already. We have the main piece of Ubuntu Development instructions available in

  • English
  • Spanish
  • Russian

now, which is just fantastic. Months of hard work were translated and some small issues sorted out by the unstoppable Dmitry Shachnev. Without his outstanding help, in translations, the guide itself, in Debian and upstream, this wouldn’t have been possible.

But also a giant “Спасибо всем!” to everybody in the Russian translator community. The Packaging Guide is not easy to translate, but still you managed to get your translations completion over 70%, which is what we require for getting the translations online.

You can help!

If you speak a language other than English, you can help. Go to the Translation page of the Packaging Guide and translate. Taking a leaf out of Dmitry’s book, I pledged to try and translate one page of German strings per day and maybe you can do the same for your language. Here’s how things stand right now:

Accepted translations:

  • Spanish (99%)
  • Russian (79%)

Translations which need more work:

  • Brazilian Portuguese (46%)
  • German (15%)
  • Japanese (14%)
  • French (7%)
  • Indonesian (5%)
  • Dutch (2%)

Translations which just were started: Italian, Telugu, Australian English, Vietnamese, Macedonian, Swedish, Turkish, Latvian, traditional Chinese, Chinese (Hong Kong), Slovenian, Hungarian, Catalan.

If you can, please do help out with this effort. You’ll enable people speaking your language to help out with Ubuntu and maybe you’ll get interested in Ubuntu development yourself.

Thanks again everyone. This is just awesome! 🙂

Next week: Ubuntu Developer Week

I mentioned the upcoming Ubuntu Developer Week in my last blog post already, but I thought I’d mention a couple more great sessions we are going to have during the event.

If you haven’t read the original post yet, here’s the quick details: running from 29th to 31st January 2013 we are going to have sessions, mostly on IRC, some on Hangouts-on-Air, where you get a introduction to all kinds of topics surrounding Ubuntu Development. After attending the sessions you will have a good idea how things roughly fit together, how to get started, who to talk to and what’s going on. It’s the perfect opportunity.

Here’s a few quotes from session leaders:

Benjamin Drung
Benjamin Drung

Benjamin Drung and Michael Bienia (of whom the internet does not seem to have any pictures whatsoever) are going to lead the Developers Roundtable and have this to say:

Do you have questions about Ubuntu development? Here you have the best opportunity to ask everything you want to know, because we will have a number of developers there who can answer your questions for you.

 

David Planella
David Planella

David Planella, who will talk about “Writing apps for Ubuntu”, says:

Learn how to use the best open source tools and technologies to write your apps on Ubuntu, both on the desktop and on the phone. You’ll be able to get your first app running in a matter of minutes!

 

 

Michael Hall
Michael Hall

Michael Hall never gets enough, so he’s giving two sessions at UDW this time around. Here’s what he has to say about Ubuntu App Developer tools: “Ubuntu provides a variety of tools to help you write and manage your applications. This session will cover everything from bootstrapping a new project, to making the final packages installable through the Software Center and everything in between.”

He will also talk about Unity integration: “The Unity desktop provides many opportunities for your application to integrate with the full user experience. Learn how to add your Application to the Unity messaging or sound indicators, add your own indicator, extend the Unity Launcher and much more.

Oliver Grawert
Oliver Grawert

We’re excited to have Oliver Grawert here, who will talk about Creating Ubuntu images and the Nexus7 images in particular. He will talk about “[t]he Ubuntu image build infrastructure at a glance, what tools do we use, how do they interact and how is the hardware set up for building the official Ubuntu images” and “[h]ow are the nexus7 images different from “normal” Ubuntu images, what can be hacked to make small modifications, how can they be re-packed or supplied with a different root file system“.

 

Alex Chiang
Alex Chiang

Alex Chiang will introduce us to the world of memory leaks and says:

As we polish and prep Ubuntu for mobile devices, a key activity will be hunting down and squashing memory leaks. This session will discuss the basic theory of leaks, introduce valgrind and our brand new apport-valgrind wrapper, and how to analyze a valgrind log file. A C/C++ background will be helpful to get the most out of this session, but is not strictly required.

Nicholas Skaggs
Nicholas Skaggs

QA mastermind Nicholas “balloons” Skaggs will talk us through “Automated Testing with autopilot” and says:

Learn about how autopilot is utilized by the unity team and quality team to test the ubuntu desktop. We’ll also provide an overview of what autopilot can do, show and run some example testcases, and give you the knowledge needed to get started writing your own autopilot testcases.

 

We are super happy to have brought this line-up of speakers to Ubuntu Developer Week this time around. Head to https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UbuntuDeveloperWeek to review the full schedule, how to join in and find out more.

Share the news with your friends and bring your questions! 🙂

Ubuntu Developer Week is back

The times for Ubuntu have never been more exciting. Cloud, server, desktop, laptop, TV, tablet, phone – everything runs Ubuntu or is soon going to. This makes developing Ubuntu very special, because fixes which go into Ubuntu in one place will benefit all form factors and all circumstances where it’s used. By improving Ubuntu you make millions of people around the globe happy.

During every 6 month release cycle we run Ubuntu Developer Week. It’s back and we’re going to have it from 29th January to 31st January. During the event we will have online sessions where seasoned Ubuntu developers introduce you to their respective area of expertise or to Ubuntu Development in general.

We will have many great sessions, from hands-on introduction to packaging and Ubuntu development to talks about how to quickly get involved in certain teams and interact with other projects. We will talk about tools and infrastructure, fixing bugs, finding memleaks, working with apps, create Ubuntu images and much much much more. This is the best opportunity to get a feel for how Ubuntu development works, get to know people and ask all the questions you might have.

I talked to a few session hosts, read below what they had to say.

Martin Pitt
Martin Pitt

Martin Pitt, who will talk about Automated Testing, says: “We have been, and are changing the Ubuntu development process to employ automated testing and avoid introducing regressions, and to improve confidence, focus, and development speed. In the first talk I will give an overview about the various kinds of tests that we do, so that you know where to watch out for failures and get debugging information. The second talk focuses on how to write tests, i.e. which technologies are available for e.g. hardware and GUI related behaviour or system-wide integration checks.”

 

Stefano Rivera
Stefano Rivera

Stefano Rivera, who will talk about Upstreams and Debian in particular, said: “So, working effectively in Ubuntu means also working with the teams and people upstream who wrote the software we distribute. I’ll talk about why this is important, when it’s necessary, and how to go about it. In particular, our most important upstream is Debian. Debian has a rather unusual (though powerful) bug-tracker. We’ll cover finding, submitting, and modifying bugs on it.

Chris Wilson
Chris Wilson

Chris Wilson, project leader of the Hundred Papercuts Team, says: “Unity may be the shiny new thing that everyone loves, but style without substance is only so much fluff, and the substance of Ubuntu is still its GTK-based apps. Once Hundred Paper Cuts focuses it’s attention on that substance, rubbing out the little annoyances that get under our skin every day we’re using Ubuntu. This session will introduce you to the project, how it works, and how to get involved. If you want to contribute to Ubuntu in a way that has the biggest impact on the quality of experience for the end user, then don’t miss this.

 

Bhavani Shankar
Bhavani Shankar

Bhavani Shankar, said about his talk about patch systems: “Many a time we wonder how to integrate a particular fix a particular part of the code in a program and upload into repositories without having to change code each time by hand and making it clumsy. In this session I’m going to show how to use different patch management systems that are in practice now.

About his talk about the app review process in Ubuntu he says: “In this session I’m going to explain the present workflow of reviewing apps and give an introduction into the new app dev upload process to automate reviews.

The forum we use for this is IRC, as it makes it easy to interact for many people without losing track, you can easily copy/paste and we can save the logs as searchable docs afterwards. You join in by simply connecting to #ubuntu-classroom on irc.freenode.net.

Check out the schedule and find more info on the Ubuntu wiki. We hope to see you all there, please let you friends know too. 🙂

The Packaging Guide finally does speak Spanish

We have achieved a huge milestone in the development community. For years we wanted translatable packaging and development documentation. It’s there. If you head to http://developer.ubuntu.com/packaging/ you can see the following:


The Ubuntu Packaging Guide (Spanish) – would you like to learn how to package or become an Ubuntu Developer? Here’s a comprehensive, topic-base guide that explores and describes the main concepts of packaging. It is available as


This is absolutely awesome. From now on we will be able to add languages and have up-to-date Packaging and Development docs available whenever they are complete enough.

This work was brought to you by many people who worked very hard to get all the bits right, both on the packaging, integration, beautification and translations sides. You all know who you are. Be proud of your work. This will ease the steps of many people into helping out with Ubuntu!

As always this is ongoing work and the great thing is, you can help out:

This makes me a very happy man and it’s great we finally got there. Now let’s get all the other translations up to scratch! 😀

Ubuntu Development Hangouts for you

Our Ubuntu Development Hangouts have had guests every now and then, but we wanted to get more people on board to talk about what’s going on in Ubuntu development. Many of our viewers asked for more detailed information about specific topics.

So here’s what we’re up to in the next weeks (we’ll add more dates and more sessions):

  • 4th Dec 2012, 15:00 UTC: Rick Spencer, Vice President of Ubuntu Engineering at Canonical will talk to us about 13.04 and the great things which are coming.
  • 11 Dec 2012, 16:00 UTC: Iain Lane, Ubuntu and Debian Developer will chat with us about desktop stuff, motu stuff, release team, backports and all that jazz.
  • 13 Dec 2012, 9:00 UTC: Didier Roche, Unity+Desktop hacker, Unity progress in 13.04, daily builds, automated tests.
  • 18 Dec 2012, 16:00 UTC: Chris Wilson, One Hundred Paper Cuts Team Lead will talk about the One Hundred Paper Cuts project, what the project does and how to get involved.
Your host
This guy will be part of the fun as well. 🙂

Upcoming Ubuntu Development Events

It’s time for some Ubuntu Development Events for those of you who are raring to go get started for 13.04 development.

We will be starting the fun today at 13:00 UTC with Ubuntu Open Week. Luckily I still managed to book a double session, so we’ll have plenty of time to get you started and introduced to Development team and what we do.

The Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS) will be happening form 29th October to 1st November in Copenhagen and we will have some workshops there as well. If you’re in town, make sure you drop by. Watch the Packaging Guide User Testing and the Get Started with Ubuntu Development workshops. For us it will be great to see how people use the Packaging Guide and what we need to fix. For you it will be great to have people around who are going to help you if you should get stuck. Also it will be a great time to catch up and get to know each other. Thanks a lot to Benjamin Drung (and others) who are going to help with these events.

There will be plenty more activity at UDS which I’ll blog about soon too. 🙂

Ubuntu Packaging Guide is progressing nicely

I’m quite happy with the progress the Packaging Guide is making. We managed to fix a bunch of bugs this cycle and most importantly we got it into Ubuntu and made it translatable. We only opened translations a couple of weeks ago, but some language teams have been hard at work:

  1. pt_BR.po (18%)
  2. ja.po (14%)
  3. ru.po (9%)
  4. es.po (5%)
  5. id.po (4%)
    de.po (4%)
  6. nl.po (1%)
  7. sv.po (0%)
    fr.po (0%)
    lv.po (0%)
    zh_TW.po (0%)
    hu.po (0%)
    ca.po (0%)

At UDS we decided that for translations which came to a percentage of completion of >= 70% we would build separate packages for those languages. Up until to that percentage we will only keep the translations in Launchpad.

This means there is still some way to go for all of us, but this is a great great step already. Thanks a lot for your hard work on this!

There are obviously many more bugs to fix and we’d love your help.

Bitesize bugs:

Make it prettier:

One bug we’d love to see some help with is #1043232 Packaging Guide FTBFS – it looks like the build fails due to Japanese translations. Right now all translations are disabled, which serves as a workaround for now.

Thanks again to everyone who helped out with the Packaging Guide. Your help has got many many contributors on their way. Keep up the good work!

The five minute introduction to Ubuntu development

We need some feedback. Can you please leave a comment with the information

  • you wish you had had heard when you got involved with Ubuntu development
  • you want to share with new starters in Ubuntu development
  • you learnt and found invaluable

As you can imagine, your feedback is going to make the experience for new contributors even better. Thanks a lot in advance.